social justice

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The Freedom To Be Whole

Goddess Temple, Indian Springs, Nevada

 When I was at Woodhull Freedom Foundation's National Sexual Freedom Day press conference on September 23rd I participated in a video interview project exploring what sexual freedom means to people. To me, sexual freedom means the freedom to be my whole self instead of having to hide the parts of myself that relate to my sexuality. 

Paul Berese, the videographer (from quimera.tv) asked me for an example of a place where I don't feel free to be my whole self. The first place that came to mind was "at work." I stumbled around a bit trying to explain. At work I do not discuss the lovers I have but to whom I am not married. I do not have many family pictures out, but the ones I do have are only of my legal family. If I am invited to a campus event and Will, my life partner and the person to whom I am happily married, cannot come, I do not bring another partner. I have a few friends at work to whom I am out as polyamorous, but it is not something that is easy to share routinely. 

There are much starker examples of where people have had their freedom limited because of their sexuality. This week alone I read about Melissa Petro, 30-year-old New York City school teacher who was removed from her classroom and placed on administrative duty because she had the audacity to write freely about her past experiences as a sex worker and about, Anderson Cooper reported on Michigan Assistant Attorney General ... writing a blog that stalks the openly gay student body president of University of Michigan, including an image of a rainbow flag superimposed with a swastika and the word "resign" (YouTube here, with image at :48), and a college student who killed himself after his sexual interactions with another man were broadcast live via iChat without his knowledge (and this in a month where at least 5 gay teens have committed suicide.)*

Simply speaking about your sexuality can cost you your job. Shame and stigma surrounding sexuality can cost one one's life.

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Queers for Economic Justice seeks Executive Director

 Queers for Economic Justice header image

JOB ANNOUNCEMENT

Executive Director

Queers for Economic Justice seeks an experienced, creative, mature, visionary, progressive leader to fill the position of Executive Director (ED). This position is full-time and located in New York City.   (Check out our website at www.qej.org/jobs for more details including a full job description)
                                
Queers for Economic Justice (QEJ) is a progressive multiracial, multi-classed and multi-gender non-profit organization committed to promoting economic justice in a context of sexual and gender liberation. We are committed to the principle that access to social and economic resources is a fundamental right, and we work to create social and economic justice through grassroots organizing, public education, advocacy and research. The organization has a staff of five, many dedicated volunteers and a committed board of directors.
 

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Queer Justice League

"Where queer superheros unite for justice" -- good queer politics commentary.
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Queers for Economic Justice

An organization that brings issues of poverty, class and inequality squarely into the realm of the LGBT rights movement.
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The Immigration Debate: LGBT Perspectives

We all too often keep important political issues separated in our mind but recognizing the ways they intersect is often the only way to produce smart policy. This event highlights the intersection of two sets of issues that many people keep separate in their minds, but that really have significant areas of overlap especially around questions discrimination, civil rights, and family status.

The Immigration Issue: LBGT Perspectives poster


 

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